Scaremongering non-BRCA+ young women

Bright Pink recently posted an article on Facebook about breast cancer risk factors for college-aged women with the following quote and commentary:

“‘Unfortunately, college-age women generally do not consider themselves at risk for breast cancer,’ said Dr. Mercier. ‘However, there are several risk factors that contribute to the development of breast cancer that need to be understood early in life to prevent the development of breast cancer down the road.’

Further support for starting this conversation NOW. Join us in learning what you can do as a young woman to reduce your risk for breast and ovarian cancer. http://www.brightpink.org/awareness-to-action/risk-reduction/’

Huh?

The article ominously notes that breast cancer “can strike at any age.” That’s true, but misleading. Breast cancer can indeed strike at any age. The youngest breast cancer survivor was just 11 years old. However, there’s a difference between what’s possible and what’s probable. Your average 30-year-old woman has just a .44% risk of breast cancer. The vast majority of women in their 20s do not get breast cancer.

You might say that it can’t hurt to make women in their 20s aware of their future risks. After all, 1 in 8 women in the United States will get breast cancer, which means that an American woman has a 12% risk of developing breast cancer in her lifetime. Shouldn’t young women be warned? I’m skeptical of that argument. Most women are already “aware” of breast cancer. They know that they should eat healthy and exercise. They know that they should have annual gynecological visits that include breast exams. They know that they are supposed to perform self breast exams (despite the fact that self exams have not proven beneficial at early detection).

At the same time, American women are at high risk for many different diseases: diabetes, heart disease, lung cancer, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s, and many others. In fact, women are greater risk for developing lung cancer and heart disease than breast cancer. Should we be warning them about these diseases too? Are young women supposed to spend their time “preventing” these diseases? That information is already out there, saturating the news, twitter, Facebook, women’s magazines, and so many other venues.

I do think that women in their 20s should be informed about breast cancer, just as they need to be informed about reproductive health in general, sexually transmitted diseases, and birth control. But there’s a difference between being informed and scaremongering.  Note the rhetoric: breast cancer “strike[s]”–it lays in wait like a biological cobra or tumorous lightning bolt; no one is safe. While there is a grain of truth here (insofar as breast cancer cuts across age, class, race, culture, and other vectors of identity), the truth is most women in their 20s do not need to be extra vigilant about breast cancer.

Moreover, it seems odd to me that Bright Pink, an organization for young BRCA+ women, would be advocating this much foreknowledge and vigilance for young women in general. BRCA+ women live in fear of cancer and with good reason. Those who test positive for a mutation at a young age spend most of their lives haunted by the threat and/or experience of cancer, but that doesn’t mean that average women of average risk should as well. There is such a thing as too much awareness, especially when it’s not backed up by good science and common sense. We need to find the line between promoting health and promoting hypochondria.