I want BRCA1/2 testing available on demand and so does Mary-Claire King

Today NPR ran a segment on Mary-Claire King in which she argues for mass testing for BRCA1/2 in average women, similar to how I argued months ago that BRCA1/2 testing should be available on demand (that post here: I want BRCA1/2 testing available on demand).

But whereas I simply had reason and political rage to drive my argument, King has hardcore science with which to back up her argument. She and her colleagues have now shown that a woman without a history of breast cancer in her family is just as likely to have a BRCA mutation as a woman who does have a history of breast cancer in her family. More importantly, both women–those with and without family histories–have the same risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. This is groundbreaking and a very good argument for widespread testing. 

The second woman NPR interviewed, Fran Visco of the National Breast Cancer Coalition, seems to think we shouldn’t do mass testing for BRCA1/2 because women might take the drastic action of needlessly having prophylactic surgeries. Really, it just sounded patronizing. NPR paraphrased her thusly: “Just because a woman has one of these mutations doesn’t mean she’ll definitely get cancer.” Really?! Who knew?! Thanks for the tip!

Some people make it sound like BRCA+ women are idiots who learn they have mutations and immediately run to back alley clinics to lop off their breasts with rusty cleavers. Choosing prophylactic mastectomy is a wee bit more complicated than that. And there are other options (as some women I know have chosen and been satisfied with).

I’m pretty embroiled in my corner of the breast cancer community–that is, I read around about breast cancer in general, but most of my time is devoted to the BRCA+ previvor/survivor corner of that community. But I’ve seen argument’s like Visco’s from women with breast cancer fairly often. It seems to pop up in every article on BRCA mutations these days. It makes me wonder if survivors in the larger breast cancer community still harbor skepticism towards prophylactic mastectomy, as was the trend in the 1990s (they rarely mention oophorectomy). Is that why King’s push for mass testing is meeting with skepticism from these quarters? Or is there resentment that previvors have forewarning that survivors didn’t have?

Very rarely do I see these kinds of arguments from BRCA+ women themselves. Even women who choose surveillance over surgery (like Linda Grier over at Elevated Risk) generally don’t disparage other women’s choices to have mastectomies.

(And yes, there are times when I do feel what Linda Grier (who sadly no longer blogs) has called “previvor’s guilt” that it took my aunt’s advanced breast cancer, mastectomy, chemo, radiation, lymphedema, and hard fight for genetic testing for our BRCA mutation to be uncovered. She has said that her cancer is a gift to the younger women in our family and to our female descendents, who now have the choice to take action. It is a gift, as well as a burden. And it isn’t fair to her, or my grandmother, or any other women with breast cancer who didn’t have the choices I have right now.)

I love the idea of mass testing–paired with genetic counseling, of course, and with the option for every woman to make an informed choice about whether or not to undergo testing. Some people just don’t want to know and we should respect those decisions, so long as they are informed decisions. And I love Mary-Claire King, who continues to kick serious ass.

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