Mary-Claire King is a feminist

king

I really disliked Kevin Davies’s and Micheal White’s Breakthrough, but on the plus side, it had this choice bit of info: “It is true that [Mary-Claire] King’s unwavering opinions irritate some of the male scientists with whom she comes in contact. She has strong feminist sentiments and, although certainly no man-hater, she can be quite scathing about male behavior. On numerous occasions, she has been critical of the patriarchal aspects of scientific research. Once, in comment on those men critical of her work in breast cancer, she said, ‘My colleagues were very skeptical, and you know how skeptical boys can be. Scorn! Scorn! Scorn!'” (72).

Again, Davies and White present feminism negatively, even when it comes to one of the heroes of the BRCA1 story, Mary-Claire King,  a woman who spent 20 years looking for the genes that cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer despite the derision of her male colleagues.

I would guess that nearly every woman in a male dominated profession has encountered the kind of “Scorn! Scorn! Scorn!” King describes, but which Davies and White seem to dismiss. In a recent interview, Mary-Claire King has this to say about patriarchal science:

INTERVIEWER: “Is it still hard to be a female scientist? Is there more pressure and competition now?”

MARY-CLAIRE KING: “The social structure of science is now very different than 40 years ago, wonderfully so. But scientific success is still difficult for young women because the years that one must be most productive, in order to establish oneself as an independent investigator, coincide exactly with the years of childbearing. It is a tremendous challenge. It can be done, but it takes a village. We need to maintain constant attention to the personal and institutional and policy details that can keep the chance for scientific life open for young women.”

So I guess that one of the few good take aways from this book is that it confirms something I’ve long suspected: Mary-Claire King is a raging feminist. Rage on, Mary-Claire, rage on.

I leave you with the trailer for the film about King’s persistence in finding BRCA1, Decoding Annie Parker, which you’ll be able to see in wide release next year. Weirdly, in the interview I cited above, King says that the makers of the film didn’t consult her about it. It seems strange and rude to make a film about an accessible living figure without even dropping them an email. Luckily, she liked the movie, but still: not cool, filmmakers, not cool.

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